No Flash player on the Google G1

October 15, 2008

After posting my video of my first experience of touching the Google G1, I went back and looked at it again.

This time I got to have a go on the keyboard and it worked quite well, a little small for me and I did hit the wrong key now and again and all I was doing was entering search terms into Google.

According to the rep I spoke to there is no Flash player on the Google G1.

This surprised me, however the problem arose due to the cost of providing a player on the phone.

I decided then to try out YouTube and see what happens, and what you get is a similar experience to the iPhone in that the phone downloads the video and plays it outside the browser in the media player. The quality was similar to the experience on the iPhone (well the iPod touch).

I also got a photo of the Google G1 next to the iPod touch.

No Flash player on the Google G1

One of the quotes that I like about the differences between the iPhone and the Nokia N95 came from quoted by Josie Fraser. EDIT: original blog post from which the quote came and Ian’s blog posting which references it.

You use the iPhone to consume content whilst you use the Nokia N95 if you want to create content.

This I agree with owning both an iPod touch and the Nokia N95.

If I want to watch video, listen to audio, see photographs or browse the web, the iPod touch wins out every time. There is no camera and no microphone so almost impossible to create original content – though the iPhone does have a (still) camera and a microphone.

Whereas on the Nokia N95, the browsing experience is painful unless you are using mobile sites. Video works as does audio, but as it doesn’t interface with iPhoto, images have to be organised manually on the phone. However in creating content, the N95 wins out, great camera for both stills and video. Third party applications allow you to get those images and films out onto the web, I use Shozu, Qik and Seesmic to do this.

So what has this got to do with the Google G1?

Well I am wondering if the Google G1 could be the first phone which is good at both creating content and consuming content.

Experiences so far show that content consumption works well on the G1, certainly viewing video and browsing the web was pretty nice and easy to do.

I did use the camera, but did not have a chance to create some content, but as the platform is relatively open I suspect we will see third party applications such as Shozu and Qik very soon.

Looking forward to getting one (if possible).

Overall I am still impressed with the phone.


Feeling and touching the Google G1

October 15, 2008

I have felt, touched and used the Google G1.

Here’s the proof…

First impressions? Well I am impressed.

The web browsing experience is very nice, same kind of touch interface as the iPhone, but with the addition of a scroll wheel which means you don’t need to use your finger unless you want to.

The keyboard is quite small, but looks quite usable and certainly more usable than the numeric keypad of phones like the Nokia N95.

The camera works as would be expected from a cameraphone, I did think that the quality could have been better, but the iPhone and N95 are just as “bad” so it’s not really a disadvanatage.

It was only a quick hands on, so didn’t have a chance to try other features or applications.

It will be in the shops in the UK on the 1st November, and for new customers will be free on £40 per month contracts, on cheaper contracts you will need to pay for the phone.

For existing customers (ie me) a different story depending on your contract, where you are in that contract and how much you pay per month.

It is different to the iPhone, but I am seriously considering getting one now.


Have you got an Innovation Prevention Department?

October 15, 2008

Here it is day three of Handheld Learning 2008.

It has been a very good conference and a good chance to see what is happening in the world of mobile and handheld learning.

Some really good stuff out there, but some sessions no more than a showcase of a product rather than how it impacts on learning.

This is not a research based conference (unlike mLearn) so there are lots of practitioners here talking about what they do, but there are also suppliers talking (or is that selling) their wares.

First presentation I have seen today was Lt Alex Smith who is using PSPs with Royal Navy personnel for learning. Quite interesting in what they are doing in what seems to be a very traditional teaching environment.

 Have you got an Innovation Prevention Department?

The second session was not really my cup of tea, very much about selling a product to schools.

Third session was presented by Jon Trinder who was presenting about connecting the physical to the virtual.

Best quote of the conference so far came from Jon, “Have you got an Innovation Prevention Department?”.