EduBlogs Nominations

November 30, 2008

Last day to nominate for the Edublog awards, here are my nominations:

1. Best individual blog – Learning with ‘e’, Steve Wheeler – I always enjoy reading Steve’s blog postings and more often then not will inspire me to write a response. Other blogs that were in the running include Josie Fraser’s SocialTech blog and Brian Kelly’s UK Web Focus. The key here was which blog did I read on a regular basis and which inspired me the most.

2. Best group blog – Pontydysgu – Lots of interesting stuff.

3. Best new blog – Dave Foord’s Weblog – Dave has a passion for using technology to support and enhance learning, he is always coming up with new ideas. A close second was Joss Winn’s Learning Lab my third choice was City College Norwich’s …from the elab…

4. Best resource sharing blog – Dave Foord’s Weblog – Dave has a passion for using technology to support and enhance learning, he is always coming up with new ideas.

5. Most influential blog post – Monkey Business – has inspired me and others to write responses, we have even recorded a podcast. F-ALT was a close second.

6. Best teacher blog – OllieBray.com – I enjoy reading Ollie Bray’s blog.

7. Best librarian / library blog – Paul Walk’s Weblog – I met Paul Walk through Twitter, met him in person on a train to the JISC Conference. I always enjoy reading his blog entries and they make me reflect on my practice and how we run our Library service.

8. Best educational tech support blog – eFoundations – this was difficult, I was torn between Andy Powell and Pete Johnston’s eFoundations blog and Brian Kelly’s UK Web Focus

9. Best elearning / corporate education blog – Andy’s Black Hole – Andy Black of Becta’s blog is always interesting. Geoff Stead’s moblearn: the mobile generation is learning … was a close second.

10. Best educational use of audio – Pontydysgu – Nominated for their use of live internet radio.

11. Best educational use of video / visual – Mark Kramer on Qik

12. Best educational wiki – F-ALT Wetpaint – this was an amazing part of ALT-C this year and has to be commended to bringing the Fringe to an educational conference and inspiring others to do the same at conferences across the world.

13. Best educational use of a social networking service – Jaiku, it’s the whole community – Though Twitter may be popular, the community of practice I have on Jaiku make me nominate Jaiku over Twitter. Flickr came close,  but it lacked the educational use for me.

16. Lifetime Achievement – Josie Fraser – what can be said about Josie, she has inspired others including me to rethink the way we use the web and the services we use.


e-Learning Stuff Podcast #009: The VLE Debate

November 30, 2008

So is the VLE the future for e-learning, the past or just a temporary solution? Are they fit for purpose or a compromise? What about the learners?

This is the ninth e-Learning Stuff Podcast, The VLE Debate.

Download the podcast in mp3 format: The VLE Debate

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

In this show, James is joined by Steve Wheeler, Rob Englebright, Dave Foord and David Sugden.

This show is a result of two blog posts one by Steve Wheeler and one by James Clay.

Shownotes

tools

Photo source.


Five Hundredth

November 29, 2008

500!

Five Hundredth

Well this is my five hundredth post on this blog. Since June 2007 when I restarted my educational blogging I have made five hundred blogs covering a range of e-learning subjects from Facebook to YouTube. I have covered MoLeNET and JISC.

There have been 51,782 views of the blog (at the time of writing) and the busiest day was Friday, March 7, 2008 when the BBC linked to my blog post on the launch of the BBC iPlayer for the iPod touch and iPhone. The most popular post was on the Sidekick Slide.

Since the blog was started I have added video and now a regular podcast.

Here’s to the next 500 posts.

Photo source.


Mobile internet usage on the rise

November 25, 2008

Mobile internet usage on the rise

BBC reports on the fast growth of mobile internet usage.

Mobile internet use is growing while the number of people going online via a PC is slowing, analyst firm Nielsen Online has found.

Some 7.3m people accessed the net via their mobile phones, during the second and third quarters of 2008.

This is an increase of 25% compared to a growth of just 3% for the PC-based net audience – now more than 35m.

One thing which the survey also found was:

It also found that the mobile net audience was younger and searched for different things.

What this demonstrates is that our learners will be (or already are) using mobile devices to search for things on the internet.

Our learners will also as a result be more likely to utilise their mobile devices to access college web services, so we should ensure that ours are accessible from a mobile device.


The dog 8 it

November 24, 2008

The dog 8 it

So what excuses do your learners come up with for not handing in their assignments or homework.

The Register reports on a survey of a thousand teachers

‘My dog ate it’, ‘I left it on the bus’, and ‘someone stole it’ – they were the classic excuses in our day for not handing in homework. But modern youth are increasingly blaming absent homework on technology, a survey’s revealed.

‘I lost my laptop’ and ‘I finished my homework, but then deleted it by accident’ were also used by kids. Printer problems is another justification.

So what modern technology excuses are your learners using?

Photo source.


e-Learning Stuff Podcast #008 – Forcing the windows open!

November 23, 2008

e-Learning Stuff Podcast #008 - Forcing the windows open!

This is the eighth e-Learning Stuff Podcast, Forcing the windows open!

Download the podcast in mp3 format: Forcing the windows open!

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

In this show, James is joined by Nick Jeans, Kev Hickey, Dave Foord and David Sugden.

In this the eighth episode of e-Learning Stuff they discuss the pros and cons of forcing links to open in new browser windows. In that discussion they cover accessibility, usability, links, legal implications, frames and then some…

Shownotes

Photo source.


Online time ‘is good for teens’

November 22, 2008

BBC report on teenager internet usage.

Surfing the internet, playing games and hanging out on social networks are important for teen development, a large study of online use has revealed.

The article is not just about social networking, it also looks at learning.

The MacArthur Foundation’s education director, Connie Yowell, concluded that the work creates a new way to look at how young people are being taught.

“Learning today is becoming increasingly peer-based and networked, and this is important to consider as we begin to re-imagine education in the 21st century,” she said.

Some of us already know this, but it is nice to have such a report to back up our experiences.


Personalisation of Assessment

November 21, 2008

Traditional assessment models in education often not only clarify the learning outcomes from the assessment, but also the mode of assessment.

For example

Write an essay on the impact of shrinking consumer income on supermarkets.

The learning outcome is quite clearly demonstrate your understanding of how falling consumer incomes will impact on the supermarket business.

But why does it have to be supermarkets?

But why does it have to be an essay?

Couldn’t the learner choose and be actively involved in designing their own assessment and therefore their own learning.

One learner may for example want to produce a radio show (podcast) which demonstrates that they understand how falling consumer incomes will impact on radio stations.

Another learner may want to have an online discussion with others on the impact of falling incomes on the places where they work.

Of course this may make assessment more challenging for the assessor, so how do we deal with that?


Flash Player for the iPhone, perhaps!

November 19, 2008

Adobe and Arm have announced that they are working togther on Flash for ARM based devices.

Adobe Systems Incorporated and ARM today announced a technology collaboration to optimize and enable Adobe® Flash® Player 10 and Adobe AIR™ for ARM Powered® devices, ranging from mobile phones to set-top boxes, mobile Internet devices, televisions, automotive platforms, personal media players and other mobile computing devices. The collaboration is expected to accelerate mobile graphics and video capabilities on ARM platforms to bring rich Internet applications and Web services to mobile devices and consumer electronics worldwide.

Macrumors speculates that this could means the iPhone.

This optimization is targeted at the existing ARM11 family (used in the iPhone) and will be available in the second half of 2009. Details are rather sparse, though the implication appears to be that this “optimization” will deliver Adobe Flash to existing mobile devices that are based on the latest ARM platforms.

PCMag further specifies that “devices with at least 200 MHz processors, more than around 16 Mbytes of RAM and a ‘completely capable [Web] browser’ will be able to render Web-based Flash content.” Apple’s iPhone, of course, fits into all these categories, which raises the question whether or not this could finally deliver Flash functionality to the current iPhone.

One of the “problems” with the iPhone and iPod touch is the lack of Flash support.

Lots of mobile learning content is Flash based and therefore does not work on the iPhone.

It is possible to create interactive learning apps for the iPhone using the SDK but that is beyond the scope for most creative teachers who want to use the device.


Flash Player for the Google G1

November 18, 2008

Flash Player for the Google G1

Okay so it is possible for Flash to run on a Google G1, previously in the blog I mentioned the lack of a Flash Player on the Google G1. According to Engadget:

At Adobe’s MAX event this morning, none other than Andy Rubin himself helped to demo Flash running on a G1, proving that it’s possible.

It would seem that Adobe and Google are working together.

Adobe and Google are pooling their collective noggins to make it happen

Good news.

Wonder if we’ll see Flash on the iPhone.