Digital Natives: The Great Debate

March 28, 2010

So do you consider the concept of digital natives and digital immigrants relevant to the work that you do?

The 8th and 9th April at the Plymouth e-Learning Conference there will be a (great) debate on digital natives.

This forum will explore methods for categorising learners approach to online platforms and how this can influence edtech/pedagogic strategies. It will focus on Marc Prensky’s famous ‘Digital Native & Digital Immigrants’ trope and the more recent ‘Visitors & Residents’ idea proposed by David White.

Questions the forum will consider:

  • Which of these systems is a more effective guide when attempting to provide appropriate technologies in configurations which encourage participation?
  • Is it possible to see ‘generational’ or age based trends in approaches to the web or is this an over simplification?
  • Does categorising learners along these lines act as a useful guide for edtechs/learning techs or are they just conceptual toys?

The two systems will be promoted by members of the panel after which the discussion will be opened to the audience.

The forum panel will be Tara Alexander (Lecturer, Health and Social Work, University of Plymouth), David White (Manager/Researcher, University of Oxford) and Steve Wheeler (Senior Lecturer in Education and Information Technology, University of Plymouth).

I have the task of chairing this session. There are some great speakers and the topic is controversial, people have many varied views on it. Should be both fun and stimulating.

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e-Learning Stuff Podcast #040: The VLE Lives

March 28, 2010

It’s alive… the VLE it’s alive… Thoughts, ideas and comments from James Clay on why and how practitioners should be using the VLE to enhance and enrich the learners’ experience.

With James Clay.

This is the fortieth  e-Learning Stuff Podcast, The VLE Lives

Download the podcast in mp3 format: The VLE Lives

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes

Shownotes

Picture source.


Sensors turn skin into gadget control pad

March 28, 2010

BBC News reports on how in the future you could control devices by touching your skin.

Tapping your forearm or hand with a finger could soon be the way you interact with gadgets.

US researchers have found a way to work out where the tap touches and use that to control phones and music players.

Coupled with a tiny projector the system can use the skin as a surface on which to display menu choices, a number pad or a screen.